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The Dance of a Yogi . Yantra Yoga

Yantra Yoga is one of the oldest recorded systems of yoga in the world. It has come to us by way of Tibet, a land that holds a vast, rich Buddhist knowledge and heritage.

Yantra Yoga’s unique series of positions and movements, combined with conscious breathing, can help coordinate and harmonize one’s personal energy so that the mind can relax and find its authentic balance. Many positions used in Yantra Yoga are similar to those of Hatha Yoga, but the way to assume and apply them differs significantly.


Yantra Yoga uses a sequence that consists of seven phases of movement, connected with seven phases of breathing. The system of Yantra Yoga contains a wide range of movements that can be applied by everyone. This fundamental and rich method is connected with the profound essence of the Dzogchen Teachings, although a Yantra Yoga practitioner does not necessarily need to follow a particular spiritual path, therefore anyone can practice it without limitation. It has been offered for the help of finding the true natural state.


Yantra Yoga is based on the ancient text Nyida Khajor, known in English as “The Union of the Sun and Moon.” This text was written in the 8th century by Vairocana, one of the most skilled Buddhist Masters and translators of his time. This teaching has been passed down from teacher to student, in an unbroken lineage, since that time. The current lineage holder, Chögyal Namkhai Norbu, a renowned cultural scholar and Dzogchen Master, has been transmitting Yantra Yoga in the West since the early 1970’s:

"A practice that helps coordinate body,energy and mind while making us more balanced and free from tension is immensely important. When more relaxed mind, it is possible to have a better, more harmonious and healthy life. This is why I decided to teach Yantra Yoga: it is something anyone can find beneficial, and it can bring more compassion and understanding among people. When we are happier, we are more open to everyone and everything around us. “


Yantra Yoga is designed to coordinate our energy through the synergy of breathing and movement. As a consequence, we become healthier and able to experience a more harmonious and relaxed state of mind. We all have three aspects of human existence in common: body, energy, and mind. When we master our energy by working with our movements and breath, the body becomes flexible and strong and our mind more alert and clear, yet harmonious and relaxed. Yantra Yoga is more than a collection of positions: each Yantra consists of a sequence of seven phases of movement and breathing centering on specific retentions of the breath. This also constitutes one of the most pronounced differences between Yantra Yoga and Hatha Yoga. While Hatha emphasizes static forms, in Yantra we do not hold asanas for a long time; the pose is just a moment in the sequence of movements, like in a dance.


Another unique feature of Yantra Yoga is that the asymmetrical poses start on opposite sides of the body for women and men. Since Yantra takes subtle energetic differences between the genders into account, the efficacy of the practice is further enhanced. As mentioned earlier, the symbolism of the sun and the moon refers to female and male energy. It is important to note here that in the Himalayan tradition of Buddhism, the male quality is lunar while the female quality is solar, a reversal of the Hindu tantric traditions, where male energy is generally identified as solar and female as lunar. In Vairochana’s Yantra Yoga, the solar side is on the right for women and on the left for men, and the goal is to equalize and balance these two energies, consequently neutralizing the effect of confusion and agitation so prevalent in our fast-paced society." ("Yantra Yoga: Tibetan Yoga of Movement" by Chögyal Namkhai Norbu)


Yantra is a mystical diagram, mainly from the Tantric traditions of the Indian religions. They are used for the worship of deities in temples or at home; as an aid in meditation; used for the benefits given by their supposed occult powers based on Hindu astrology and tantric texts. They are also used for adornment of temple floors, due mainly to their aesthetic and symmetric qualities. Specific yantras are traditionally associated with specific deities.


Enjoy the rythme !

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